CATEGORY: Pro Se Law and Self Representation Questions

Answers to Frequently Asked Pro Se Law and Self-Representation Questions

Can I Use a Joint Bank Account to Give Money to a Beneficiary and Avoid Probate?

Bank account owned jointly “with rights of survivorship” are not subject to the probate process when one of the owners dies.

Upon the death of one owner, the other account owner simply continues to own and have complete access to the money in the account.

But there are several drawbacks to setting up and using this type of bank account: Continue reading Can I Use a Joint Bank Account to Give Money to a Beneficiary and Avoid Probate?

Can an Attorney Send Me a Letter Threatening Multiple Legal Actions if I Don’t Comply with a Demand?

A written statement of potential legal actions to follow should an agreement not be reached is acceptable within a letter from an attorney.

But the ‘threat’ of legal action is not the same as the actualization that the Court will agree with and enforce the threatened stance. Continue reading Can an Attorney Send Me a Letter Threatening Multiple Legal Actions if I Don’t Comply with a Demand?

If I Have Multiple Living Will Documents, Will a Notary Signature on One Be Enough to Cover All?

A complete Living Will indeed does contain a number of different documents: an Advanced Healthcare Directive document, Durable Property Power of Attorney documents, a HIPAA Medical Records Release Authorization form, the Notice of Final Disposition document, etc.

Sometimes these documents are provided separately, sometimes they are folded into one long document.  Continue reading If I Have Multiple Living Will Documents, Will a Notary Signature on One Be Enough to Cover All?

Must the Maker of a Document Be Present for a Notary to Authenticate a Signature?

One can have a document notarized without the notary being in the same location as the Maker of the document at the time of signing. This is done by providing identification to the notary public and acknowledging to the notary that the signature on the document is that of the person seeking the notarization.

Witnesses listed on a signed document must be present at the time of signing, however.